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Essay about Shrek 2

Most fairy tales usually are put together in the same format where something has to be perfect to have a happily ever after. For example, in Cinderella, or let alone any other fairy tale, it follows the same outline that the girl has to be perfect, funny, and nice to have a happily ever after. However, this isn’t the case for Shrek 2. Fiona doesn’t really meet those standards that you see in a fairy tale. She is an ogre, and she fights bad guys, but while doing this she is the most happy and living a good life. Shrek 2 uses satire to make fun of and mock fairy tales and shows you don’t have to be perfect to have a happily ever after. Satire is defined as a literary work that ridicules it’s subject in order to make a comment or criticism about it. For example, in Shrek 2, the satire used is exaggeration and role reversal. The directors uses the satire, exaggeration and role reversal, to express how you need to be yourself and it doesn’t matter who you are, or what people think of you, go for your dreams and goals, to have a happily ever after.

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Dear future me

My eighth grade year has gone pretty good, but has been stressful in some classes. Since the beggining of the year I have tried to not have any late homework or missing assignments. I have been able to keep that goal. When I began 8th grade year I knew the teachers were going to be more harsh and that there was going to be more homeowork. I was mostly excited for my math class. I know I am not the best and you know that, but I wanted to start fresh and give myself a chance to work harder to be the best I can be.

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The death penalty is used to deter killers

It teaches the lesson that it is acceptable to kill, as long as the state is the one doing the killing. Hence the term "capital punishment." This is somewhat paradoxical,” states Brad Bushman professor of psychology at Ohio State University. Death Penalty’s are wrong to begin with but when you kill the wrong person an innocent person because of false evidence its an innocent life that was taken/seized.

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The Domesticity and Disguised Symbolism of the Merode Trifyct

The Merode Triptych represents domesticity unlike any other 15th-century devotional altarpiece through its use of disguised religious symbolism in everyday household items such as pitchers, mousetraps, and books; as well as featuring Mary`s spouse, Joseph, who rarely appears in religious scenes. Campin designed the Triptych to serve as a devotional altarpiece made for a personal client of his. The altarpiece which is painted in oil has intense attention to detail that makes the piece come to life. The inclusion of the Flemish town in the background of the left and right panel makes audience feel part of the piece. The simplicity of the cottage in the center panel leads one to notice the everyday household objects in Mary's domestic life. Additionally, we observe Mary seated on a bench lowered toward the ground making her humility shine through. Disguised religious symbols can be witnessed in everyday household objects like the fluttering pages of a book or lilies sitting in a blue pitcher. The right panel shows Joseph in a workshop that also include objects of religious symbols like the mousetrap which is thought to represent the devil.

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